An Enlightening Interview with Pushpendra Mehta, The Author of The Suitable Inheritor

Reading the book, The Suitable Inheritor, I found so many pearls of wisdom that I had to approach the author to get more insight into various topics. To my delight, Pushpendra graciously accepted my offer of an interview. This has been a fascinating Q&A. Without further ado, let’s dig deep into a great chat with the author.

Ankita: The description of Lima is quite vivid and divine in your book. Did you visit it and fall in love with it?

Pushpendra: Yes. I did visit Lima (Peru) on a business trip. While in Lima, my colleagues and I visited Larcomar, a unique shopping and entertainment centre that is located at the top of a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean. I fell in love with the breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean. It was here that a few colleagues suggested I write a novel that featured Larcomar and Lima. The seeds of my novel, “The Suitable Inheritor” were sown in Larcomar.

Ankita: It is not difficult to see that you have put a lot of thought in writing the female characters, Dorothy and Meher. Their intellectual profile, I believe, must be inspired by the ladies who have somehow touched your life. Care to comment?

Pushpendra: I feel blessed and fortunate to have been befriended by smart, wise, profound, and extraordinary women. They have helped me grow as a person and enriched my written voice.

Ankita: As the major part of your book is based on the career prospect of people, I would like to ask something in this particular area. “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” This is a simple and well-known saying; however, is it really that simple?

Pushpendra: It is not simple because most people are looking for a successful career and not an exceptional career. They advocate conventional career choices for a secure successful life and eschew struggle, sacrifice, risk, and differentiated thinking. But they forget that these attributes are imperatives for an extraordinary career. The courage to pursue your passion may be laden in the short run with struggle, but if you are immersed in what you truly love, and an endeavour that doesn’t feel like work, you’ll find extraordinary happiness and success. Remember, fortune favours the bold.

Ankita: A question on the similar lines as above, our lead character, Michael, made quite a few transitions in his career to finally find a career that excites him. However, all these transitions were somehow closely connected. Imagine a person dreaming of making a step towards their lifelong dream, but, having spent a considerate amount of time in a job that is drastically different from their dream, could a leap of faith really work for this person? What should be the guidelines for him? Isn’t there an age limit to which one should dare to dream?

Pushpendra: A leap of faith is a must irrespective of whether the transition is closely connected or a diametrically different one from the present occupation. J.K. Rowling, Rashmi Sinha, Amitabh Bachchan, Hugh Grant, Morgan Freeman, M.S. Dhoni, and more have made radical career changes spurred by heightened self-belief, hard work, focus, and indomitable tenacity.

I believe you are never too old to dream a new dream. Frank McCourt didn’t take up writing until he was 65. He later received the Pulitzer Prize. My granduncle, Dr. Mohan Sinha Mehta (member of the Constituent Assembly of India in 1947) founded Seva Mandir (NGO) in Rajasthan at the age of 70. Today, Seva Mandir is one of the most prominent NGOs in India.

Ankita: Do you have any “drastic career shift” story to motivate the readers?

Pushpendra: I quit a great financial services marketing job to make a foray into online news media entrepreneurship. This was an unrelated and drastic career shift. Few believed in me, and yet amidst all odds, I had a successful stint as an entrepreneur. Subsequently, I have acted as a mentor to entrepreneurs.

Ankita: I adore the character of Dorothy. Her insightful dialogues gave me goosebumps, at times. I am sure that you have done a lot of research in writing her lines. Where did you find the content to make her so profound?

Pushpendra: “The Suitable Inheritor” and Dorothy’s character emanates from my experiences and conversations. I have been blessed to have met evolved women both in the East and the West that enabled me to create an unusual story of true love, profound relationships, self-discovery, and extraordinary success.

Ankita: Is there any character in this book that is a reflection of you?

Pushpendra: As a storyteller, I started with myself because the characters in my novel are all part of me, and observations of the world around me. As a writer, I have learnt to reveal emotional truths inside of me, while projecting the readers’ emotions into my characters to liven up the chapters.

Ankita: Now, a fun question! If you were stranded on an isolated island for one week and you find a genie. He says that you would get three wishes, but none of the wishes could be about getting out of this island. What would you ask for?

Pushpendra: An interesting companion, a lighter, a journal and pen.

Ankita: Do you have any favorite book that you read over and over again?

Pushpendra: Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

Ankita: Do you have any advice for the people who are searching for love?

Pushpendra: You have to plunge in love as if your world revolves around your heart’s desire. In essence, you give in love, you invest in love, and you crave in love to stay devoted in love. That is the acme of adoration.

Ankita: Are you working on any other book? Wanna share a few tidbits about it?

Pushpendra: I have a few ideas for my next book. Hopefully, will get started in 2017.

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